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CHANGING NATURE OF SOVEREIGNTY

Richard Haass
Oct 10, 2004

Richard N. Haass, President of the CFR, gives us a general blueprint for eroding national sovereignties worldwide. Expect the implementation of more "currency blocs" as transitional bridges to build a single world government. Here's a snippet:
... Debates over ceding sovereignty voluntarily can prove heated, as citizens imagine the implications for their national identity and democratic institutions. We see this today in Europe, where countries are relinquishing independence to a degree not seen since the age of Charlemagne. In a step inconceivable two generations ago, the mark, franc, and lira have been replaced by the euro. Even as it plans a new round of expansion, the European Union is hard at work at a federal constitution that is likely to require extensive grants of sovereignty from national governments to a stronger European Parliament, Commission, and Council and perhaps even a European president. This transformation is reminiscent of (and potentially as profound as) the transition that our own country made more than two centuries ago, when we moved from a loose collection of states under the Articles of Confederation to an effective federal union under the Constitution.

Outside of Europe, few countries are prepared to grant such authority to supranational institutions. But all nations confront a basic, recurrent dilemma: when to trade off freedom of action for enhanced capacity to shape their future. Experience has taught that it often makes sense for countries, even one as powerful as the United States, to delegate sovereignty to international institutions, in return for tangible benefits that might not otherwise be within reach.

In our own daily lives, exchanging absolute freedom of action for the long-term collective good is something we do all the time. When we drive a car, we obey traffic laws, both for our own safety and the safety of others and we count on others to do the same. Imagine the chaos if some of us drove on the left rather than the right, or if some drivers kept their headlights off at night...


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